03
Jun-2016

Visual Adventures: Jerash, exploring the Greek and Roman ‘Antioch on the Golden River’

Jerash, situated an hour car ride from Jordan’s capital of Amman, dates back to the Greek period. Known as Gerasa in ancient times, it was termed the Antioch on the Golden River and was the capital and largest city of the Jersah Governorate. Found by either Alexander the Great or his general Perdiccas around 331 BC, today it is one of the most important and best preserved Roman Cities in Asia Minor. A prosperous city, in AD 106 the Emperor Trajan constructed roads throughout the region increasing trade to Jerash. In AD 129-130, Emperor Hadrian visited Jerash and a flurry of building proceeded his arrival. At it’s zenith, Jerash was one of the largest cities in Asia Minor, rivaled only by Ephesus. Today talking a walk through Jerash brings travelers back in time to the height of the Greek and Roman empires. Dubbed ‘the Rome away from Rome’ by the Jordanian Tourist Board, Jerash is worth a visit on any trip to Amman.

View of the Oval Plaza. Jerash is unique - not to many oval Greco-Roman plaza's out there in the world. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography

View of the Oval Plaza. Jerash is unique – not to many oval Greco-Roman plaza’s out there in the world. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography

 

Hadrian's Gate. Main entrance to Jerash. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Hadrian’s Gate. Main entrance to Jerash. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

 

One of Jerash's two amphitheatres. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

One of Jerash’s two amphitheatres. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Traditional musicians entertain travelers at Jerash, demonstrating the spectacular acoustics in the amphitheatre. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Traditional musicians entertain travelers at Jerash, demonstrating the spectacular acoustics in the amphitheatre. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

 

Walking on the footsteps of statesmen, emperors, philosophers and generals of the Roman empire. Cardo Maximus. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Walking on the footsteps of statesmen, emperors, philosophers and generals of the Roman empire. Cardo Maximus. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

 

The old jutting up against the new. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

The old jutting up against the new. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Jerash is just as popular with locals as a place to stroll, as it is with travelers. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Jerash is just as popular with locals as a place to stroll, as it is with travelers. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Don't forget to look up. Many of the columns and buildings still retain their fine upper detailing. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Don’t forget to look up. Many of the columns and buildings still retain their fine upper detailing. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

 

Second theatre decorated for a Jordanian holiday. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Second theatre decorated for a Jordanian holiday. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

 

Jerash's second theatre, the final gate and the city of Jerash in the distance. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

Jerash’s second theatre, the final gate and the city of Jerash in the distance. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

 

The final gate at Jerash and the end of the colonnaded street. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

The final gate at Jerash and the end of the colonnaded street. Photo: Genevieve Hathaway Photography.

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